Sun, 20 Apr 2003

Memo to "J.T."

Hey guy, decaf next time.

I bet you think this song is about you
Don't you
Don't you?

Ease up, you're going to strain a muscle or something.

I'd still like to know who took it upon themselves to "excerpt" that silly little entry, with important context links (namely, this one) stripped, when I made a point not to send a ping. I always thought those silly licenses people attach to their weblogs were bogus and unnecessary, but if people are going to be dumbasses I can see the reasons, at least from a CYA point-of-view.

edit: Why operating a keyboard after a night of drinking is usually a bad idea. If you've got anything to say about this, post it as a comment here, and leave poor Sam and his readers out of it.

edit: apparently it's an automated referrer-chasing script. That restores my faith in humanity a bit -- it's good to know that no live human was involved in that appalling bit of context-free quoting. Excuse the "license" bit above as the rantings of someone operating under the influence of too little sleep and too much JT.

JT -- no hard feelings. Peace.

:: 04:22
:: /humor/people | [+]
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The Magic Word:
Which planet is closest to the sun? (hint -- it's Mercury...)




What does it take for Americans to do great things; to go to the moon, to
win wars, to dig canals linking oceans, to build railroads across a continent?
In independent thought about this question, Neil Armstrong and I concluded
that it takes a coincidence of four conditions, or in Neil’s view, the
simultaneous peaking of four of the many cycles of American life. First, a
base of technology must exist from which to do the thing to be done. Second,
a period of national uneasiness about America’s place in the scheme of human
activities must exist. Third, some catalytic event must occur that focuses
the national attention upon the direction to proceed. Finally, an articulate
and wise leader must sense these first three conditions and put forth with
words and action the great thing to be accomplished. The motivation of young
Americans to do what needs to be done flows from such a coincidence of
conditions. … The Thomas Jeffersons, The Teddy Roosevelts, The John
Kennedys appear. We must begin to create the tools of leadership which they,
and their young frontiersmen, will require to lead us onward and upward.
— Dr. Harrison H. Schmidt