Mon, 13 Apr 2009

Everyday Cooking Folk Wisdom (Breakfast Edition)

Some of these things I may have seen in cookbooks, some are things I heard over the years, and a lot of them are just kind of “common sensical” things I’ve figured out over the years.

  • Best scrambled eggs
    • Beat the hell out of them. Really. Crack them in a bowl and go at them with a wire whisk for minutes.
    • Don’t add milk to them before cooking.
    • If you’re scrambling them with cheese, grate it to death. Use really, really small pieces and don’t overdo it.
    • Use a clean(ish) pan and clean(ish) oil/grease. If you’re using bacon or sausage grease, strain all of the crud out of it.
    • As soon as they’re done, turn off the heat then splash a little (don’t overdo it) milk over them, swirl them around with the spatula until the milk is absorbed, serve them immediately, the hotter the better.
  • Omelettes
    • Use a good pan (duh), and clean oil
    • Pour the egg into a hot (but not too hot) pan. Swirl the pan around until the egg evenly coats the skillet.
    • You’ll be tempted to mess with it at this point. Don’t. Just let it sizzle until you start to worry that you’ve overdone it. Then add your fillings to one half of the omelette.
    • Use a decent spatula to flip the unoccupied half over the first.
    • Wait about 30 seconds.
    • Serve to plate
  • Coffee
    • Use a french press. Trust me on this — drip coffee doesn’t come close. Don’t drink the last half centimeter or so. It’s full of grounds. Rinse your cup and get some more.
    • Use less sweetener.
  • Link sausage
    • Add a half-centimeter of water to the skillet along w/ the links
    • A half-thimble of oil added to the water will keep the sausage skins from sticking to the skillet
    • Sprinkle light salt and black pepper over the links while cooking

:: 13:23
:: /entertainment/foodanddrink | [+]
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