Sun, 20 Apr 2003

Metametadiscussion?

The recent Scheißstürm (is that a real German slang word or am I just fronting? no idea...) illustrates that, for purposes of establishing identity in a long and contentious thread, trackbacks are more useful than comment entries. And don't get me started on those plaintext excerpts again. I suppose trackbacking preëmptively is a good habit to get into, because if one manually sends a ping, at least you get to control what gets excerpted.

:: 18:07
:: /tech/computers/web/rants | [+]
::Comments (0)

Memo to "J.T."

Hey guy, decaf next time.

I bet you think this song is about you
Don't you
Don't you?

Ease up, you're going to strain a muscle or something.

I'd still like to know who took it upon themselves to "excerpt" that silly little entry, with important context links (namely, this one) stripped, when I made a point not to send a ping. I always thought those silly licenses people attach to their weblogs were bogus and unnecessary, but if people are going to be dumbasses I can see the reasons, at least from a CYA point-of-view.

edit: Why operating a keyboard after a night of drinking is usually a bad idea. If you've got anything to say about this, post it as a comment here, and leave poor Sam and his readers out of it.

edit: apparently it's an automated referrer-chasing script. That restores my faith in humanity a bit -- it's good to know that no live human was involved in that appalling bit of context-free quoting. Excuse the "license" bit above as the rantings of someone operating under the influence of too little sleep and too much JT.

JT -- no hard feelings. Peace.

:: 04:22
:: /humor/people | [+]
::Comments (0)




Dear Mister Language Person: I am curious about the expression, “Part of
this complete breakfast”. The way it comes up is, my 5-year-old will be
watching TV cartoon shows in the morning, and they’ll show a commercial for
a children’s compressed breakfast compound such as “Froot Loops” or “Lucky
Charms”, and they always show it sitting on a table next to some actual food
such as eggs, and the announcer always says: “Part of this complete
breakfast”. Don’t that really mean, “Adjacent to this complete breakfast”,
or “On the same table as this complete breakfast”? And couldn’t they make
essentially the same claim if, instead of Froot Loops, they put a can of
shaving cream there, or a dead bat?

Answer: Yes.
— Dave Barry, “Tips for Writer’s”